FAQs

Where are all these metaphors? I can’t spot them!

Clean Language questions are most often - and most usefully - used to ask about the metaphors a person uses. Being asked the questions helps to bring the metaphors to life, making new information available to the person. But what if you're not noticing metaphors yet?...

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Where can I stay near your training venue?

Clean Change Company's open trainings normally take place at Old Deer Park, 187 Kew Road, Richmond TW9 2AZ. A useful list of accommodation in private homes nearby is at http://www.kewaccommodation.com Some other convenient places to stay (with B+B prices as at October...

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What’s it like training with Clean Change Company?

All our courses appeal to people who like to challenge, think and integrate new learning. Don't attend if you prefer to be "sheep-dipped"! You will learn in a relatively small group - normally up to a couple of dozen participants - supported by a good ratio of...

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Why the big deal about metaphors?

Metaphors are very powerful. They bundle a lot of information into a small package, and make the conceptual more tangible. We live our metaphors. Someone who thinks their work team is like a Formula One pit crew will live their work very differently from someone whose...

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Why bother with eliciting metaphors?

There are a number of reasons you might want to elicit a person's metaphors. One is simply to find out what's going on for the person (for example, marketing guru Gerald Zaltman, author of 'How Customers Think' and 'Marketing Metaphoria' uses a Cleanish process to...

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Where did Clean come from?

It started with Clean Language – a set of simple, powerful questions that were developed by therapist David Grove during the 1980s and ‘90s. They were designed to help him avoid ‘leading the witness’ by introducing his own assumptions into a session, and to help...

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What’s ‘Clean’ about Clean Language?

The originator of Clean Language, David Grove, was briefly involved in NLP before he went off to become a clinical psychologist and originally, his meaning of 'clean' was presumably the same as the NLP one - the intention to use only the client's words etc. As he...

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