Hi [member_name_first],

Exciting times here at Clean Change HQ: we’re expecting the first copies of Clean Language: Revealing Metaphors and Opening Minds to arrive from the publisher’s today. You can now read Chapter 1 on-line at Amazon: we hope you enjoy it.

But it seems like writing the book to match the brief – an accessible ‘how to’ guide that anyone could pick up and use straight away – was the easy part! We’re guessing that the book won’t sell itself (even with reviews like these), so we’re finding lots of places to promote it. We’ll be at the NLP Conference in London on 7 – 9 November, Wendy Sullivan has been interviewed for the February edition of Psychologies magazine, and Judy’s been heading up and down the country to speak at various groups. Any other ideas? We’d love to hear from you.
Judy Rees

In this issue:
Joining up the work of David Grove
Cleaning Tip: What would you like to have happen?
Using Clean with young and old
Record number of French events
Clean Business Exchange, 19-20 November
More Clean Events

Joining up the work of David Grove

James Lawley has just put his new paper online: Joining Up the work
of David Grove (http://www.cleanlanguage.co.uk/articles/articles/222/1/Joining-Up-the-work-of-David-Grove/Page1.html).
This paper, written for The Developing Group, presents a model that ‘joins up’ the three main phases of David Grove’s work. Rather than trying to integrate the phases into a single process, James has attempted to maintain the individuality of each domain and language model.

The paper was developed out of James and Penny’s Clean Conference presentation: a recording of that provides good background information and is available at: http://www.cleanchange.co.uk/store/downloads-c-1.html

Cleaning Tip: What would you like to have happen?

Times are tough for a lot of people at the moment, with plenty to worry and complain about. But whatever is happening, they will have to find a way of going forward. And to do that, the first step is often to focus on what you’d like, not what you don’t want. Imagine going to the supermarket with a list of all the things you don’t want and you’ll get the picture.

So when a friend, colleague or client is sharing their hardship or complaining about it to you – however justified it might be – you might consider using Clean Language to direct their attention to what they would like instead, and to get them talking about their hopes and dreams rather than those magnetic problems.

Acknowledge what they have said and ask: “And when all of that, what would you like to have happen?” Depending on the context, you could then use other Clean Language questions to develop a metaphor for their desired outcome.

Using Clean with young and old

Two contrasting success stories this month.
On Michael Mallows’ blog (http://craftylistening.blogspot.com/2008/10/clean-language.html), you can find the story of how Derek Jackson used Clean Language with his elderly mother.
On the Clean Change site (http://www.cleanchange.co.uk/store/CleanLanguage/2008/10/20/clean-language-in-the-playground/) Julie McCracken details how she’s used Clean Language with six-year-olds in the playground.

If you have a blog which mentions Clean Language, please let us know so we can link to it.

Record number of French events
The French publication of “Des métaphores dans la tête: Transformation par la Modélisation Symbolique et le Clean Language (http://www.cleanlanguage.co.uk/articles/articles/169/1/Des-metaphores-dans-la-tete/Page1.html)” by Lawley and Tompkins continues to generate interest in Symbolic Modelling and other derivatives of David Grove’s work in the French speaking world.

There are now over 40 events in French listed – a record! To see them, please visit our French Calendar of Events (http://www.cleanlanguage.co.uk/articles/pages/French-Clean-Events.html).

Clean Business Exchange, 19-20 November, Old Deer Park, Richmond, West London
Interested in:
discovering how Clean Space and Emergent Knowledge can improve an organisation’s
performance?
using Clean to design projects, build a Business plan, or profile the personalities of your
team?
meeting like-minded people who are passionate about putting Clean to work?
If your answer is ‘yes’ to any of these, or if you simply want to Exchange ideas, tools and contacts, click here (http://www.cleanchange.co.uk/store/clean-business-exchange-2008-p-24.html).

More Clean Events
Following feedback from site users, an events calendar has now been added to www.cleanchange.co.uk (http://www.cleanchange.co.uk). Do check it out!

First Symbolic Modelling Workshop in Australia: 31 Jan – 2 Feb 2009
Penny Tompkins and James Lawley, developers of Symbolic Modelling will be giving the
first Australian workshop in Sydney: Metaphors in Mind — Personal change through the new science of emergence (http://www.cleanlanguage.co.uk/articles/articles/221/1/Australia-Workshop-2009/Page1.html).

And don’t forget the one-day introductory workshop on Clean Language with Wendy Sullivan and Judy Rees in central London on 1 November. Details can be found here (http://www.alternatives.org.uk/Site/EventDescription.aspx?EventID=611%20).

This newsletter is issued by Clean Change Company in association with The Developing Company. It aims to keep you in touch with the latest developments in Clean Language and Symbolic Modelling, spread the word of what people are doing in the Clean Community and offer opportunities to develop yourself, both professionally and personally.
Number 10 – 2008

2 Responses to “October 2008 Clean News: books, blogs and beginnings”

  1. [...] October 2008 Clean News: books, blogs and beginnings first Australian workshop in Sydney: Metaphors in Mind — Personal change through the new science of emergence (www.cleanlanguage.co.uk/articles/articles/221/1/Australia-Workshop-2009/Page1.html). … [...]

  2. [...] October 2008 Clean News: books, blogs and beginnings first Australian workshop in Sydney: Metaphors in Mind — Personal change through the new science of emergence (www.cleanlanguage.co.uk/articles/articles/221/1/Australia-Workshop-2009/Page1.html). … [...]

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